Cholera

Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholera of serogroups O1 or O139. Humans are the only relevant reservoir, even though Vibrios can survive for a long time in coastal waters contaminated by human excreta.

Consumption of contaminated water and food, especially seafood eaten under-cooked, results in infection. After a short incubation period of less than five days, the typical symptoms might develop, characterised by vomiting and watery diarrhoea. In most cases, though, symptoms are mild or absent and infected individuals become carriers with no symptoms.

With timely treatment (fluid replacement and antibiotics), less than 1% of patients with symptoms die. The disease has not been endemic in Europe for a long time, and thanks to high hygiene standards the potential for imported cases to generate further ones is low.

Latest outputs

Publication

Communicable disease threats report, 13-19 June 2021, week 24

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Communicable disease threats report, 16-22 May 2021, week 20

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Communicable disease threats report, 28 February-6 March 2021, week 9

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Communicable disease threats report, 31 January-6 February 2021, week 5

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Communicable disease threats report, 22-28 November 2020, week 48

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Peer-Reviewed Publication

Mapping the burden of cholera in sub-Saharan Africa and implications for control: an analysis of data across geographical scales

May 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

Unexplored Opportunities: Use of Climate- and Weather-Driven Early Warning Systems to Reduce the Burden of Infectious Diseases

Jan 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

The 2018 report of the Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: shaping the health of nations for centuries to come

Jan 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

Environmental suitability of vibrio infections in a warming climate: An early warning system

Jan 2017

Peer-Reviewed Publication

Lebanon’s experience in surveillance of communicable diseases during a mass gathering: Sixth Francophone Games, 2009

Jan 2017

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Disease networks

European Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses Network (FWD-Net)